LEST WE FORGET

By Bennie J. McRae, Jr.

©Copyright 1993-2008, Trotwood, Ohio

Reaching out to the World From
TROTWOOD, OHIO
the Heartland of
THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

 

Click for Trotwood, Ohio Forecast

 
 
 

Welcome to

Our agenda is simple. The contributors and I offer you the history, culture, preservation efforts, and current events of African-Americans, other ethnic, non-ethnic groups and individuals. We focus on and emphasize their sacrifices, relationships, interactions, patriotism as well as their contributions to the growth and development of this great nation. Let us never forget them.

Bennie J. McRae, Jr. - Researcher and Site Manager

"Knowledge is worthless, if it is not shared" - Tom Brooks, Historian - Gravenhurst, Ontario

LEST 
WE
FORGET

FAMILY OF WEB SITES AND INDEX PAGES

http://www.lwfaah.net/webs.htm

THIS LAND IS YOUR LAND


 

AFRICAN AMERICAN
MILITARY HISTORY

REVOLUTIONARY WAR

WAR OF 1812

CIVIL WAR

WESTERN FRONTIER

SPANISH AMERICAN WAR

WORLD WAR I

WORLD WAR II

KOREAN WAR

VIETNAM WAR

 

RECONSTRUCTION IN ALABAMA
(1868-1878)

Alabama's First Black Lawmakers

http://www.lwfaah.net/alabama/reconstruction.htm
 


 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

EVENTS

NEWS - COMMENTARIES - HISTORIC FACTS

PEOPLEPLACES

 

MILITARY RECORDS AND VETERANS REFERENCE DESK

LEST WE FORGET

THE FALLEN HEROES ABOARD THE USS COLE

 

LEST WE FORGET

AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY

September 11, 2001

World Trade Center
The Pentagon
Somerset County, Pennsylvania

 

 

IN MEMORIAM

THE CREW OF STS-107

LOST: SPACE SHUTTLE COLUMBIA

THE FINAL ROLL CALL


LEST WE FORGET

 

U. S. and Coalition Casualties in Iraq

 


 
THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR

"FREEDOM FIGHTERS"

UNITED STATES COLORED TROOPS

http://www.lwfaam.net/cw/

"I highly recommend the best USCT sites on the web" William Gladstone, Civil War Historian

"The most informative web sites on the African American experience during the Civil War" Murry Dorty, Military Historian

 

A Short Course in U. S. History

THIS LAND IS YOUR LAND

THE MAKING OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

 

PRAYER FOR BROTHERHOOD


 

The Flags

That Ragged Old Flag

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA DIGITAL COLLECTION
African Americans Seen Through the Eyes of the Newsreel Cameraman

http://www.sc.edu/library/digital/collections/flmovietone.html

“A flag is the emblem of sovereignty -
a symbol and guarantee of protection.
Every nation and people are proud of
the flag of their country. England, for
a thousand years boasts her Red flag
and Cross of St. George; France glories
in her Tri-color and Imperial Eagle; ours
the ‘Star-spangled Banner,’ far more
beautiful than they - this dear old flag! -
the sun in heaven never looked down
on so proud a banner of beauty and glory.
Men of the Black Brigade, rally around it!
Assert your manhood, be loyal to duty,
be obedient, hopeful, patient. Slavery
will soon die; the slaveholders’ rebellion,
accursed of God and man, will shortly
and miserably perish. There will then be,
through all the coming ages, in very truth,
a land of the free - one country, one flag,
one destiny. I charge you, Men of the
Black Brigade of Cincinnati, remember
that for you, and for me, and for your
children, and your children’s children,
there is but one Flag, as there is but
one Bible, and one God, the Father of us all.”
James Lupton,
Acting Camp Commandant
presenting the National flag to The Cincinnati Black Brigade
September 4, 1862
"What a wonderful revolution.
In 1861 the Southern papers were
full of advertisements for 'slaves,'
but now, despite all the hindrances
and 'race problems,' my people are
striving to attain the full standard of
all other races born in the sight of God,
and in a number of instances have
succeeded. Justice we ask - to be
citizens of these United States, where
so many of our people have shed their
blood with their white comrades, that
the stars and stripes should never be polluted."
Susie King Taylor - 1902

African American Military History

http://www.lwfaam.net/

 

African American Radio

By Donna Halper

http://www.lwfaah.net/aaradio/home.htm


 

Genealogy~Photography~Restoration

 by George Geder

http://geder.wordpress.com/


 

 "Honor, From Civil War to Civil Rights"©  


http://www.lwfaah.net/rock.htm
Researched, written and submitted by
 Victorio Loubriel
New York, NY
Film Director, Civil Rights Photo-Essayist, Author and Lecturer
http://www.vlphotogallery.com/


 

THE SPIRIT OF

FREDERICK DOUGLASS

 

http://www.spiritoffrederickdouglass.com

 


 

LEST WE FORGET

Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall
1908 - 1993

"Thurgood Marshall was America's leading radical. He led a civil rights revolution in the 20th century that forever changed the landscape of American society. But he is the least well known of the three leading black figures of this century. Martin Luther King Jr., with his preachings of love and non-violent resistance, and Malcolm X, the fiery street preacher who advocated a bloody overthrow of the system, are both more closely associate in the popular mind and myth with the civil rights struggle. But it was Thurgood Marshall, working through the courts to eradicate the legacy of slavery and destroying the racist segregation system of Jim Crow, who had an even more profound and lasting effect on race relations than either of King or X."

http://www.thurgoodmarshall.com/home.htm
 

"Marshall was nominated by President John F. Kennedy for appointment to the Second Supreme Court of Appeals in 1961. The appointment was confirmed by the Senate. President Lyndon B. Johnson nominated Marshall for appointment as Solicitor General of the United States. In August of 1965, Judge Marshall took his oath In June of 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson nominated Judge Marshall to become an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. This nomination was indeed a historical event, Marshall became the first African-American to serve as a Justice of the Supreme Court."

http://library.thinkquest.org/3337/tmarsh.html

 

INDEX

http://www.lwfaah.net/marshall/index.htm

 


 

RECONSTRUCTION IN ALABAMA
(1868-1878)

Alabama's First Black Lawmakers

http://www.lwfaah.net/alabama/reconstruction.htm
 

 

LEST WE FORGET

Judge Frank M. Johnson

1918-1999

"In 1955, President Eisenhower appointed the 37-year-old Johnson to the U.S. District Court. The next year, following the Montgomery bus boycott, he ruled against segregated city buses. In later actions, he was the first judge to order names of qualified African Americans added to county voting rolls, and he wrote the first statewide school desegregation decree. He outlawed discrimination in Alabama's libraries, transportation centers, and agricultural extension service. He placed numerous state agencies under judicial review. After brutal beatings of Freedom Riders at Montgomery's Greyhound Terminal, he temporarily restrained the city and the Klan from future wrongs against the protestors. He helped strike down literacy tests and other unfair practices when he ordered voting registrars to apply consistent standards. One of Johnson's major accomplishments was his opening of U.S. Route 80 for the Selma-to-Montgomery March."

http://www.medaloffreedom.com/FrankJohnson.htm

INDEX

http://www.lwfaah.net/johnson/index.htm
 

LEST WE FORGET

HOMER ADOLPH PLESSY
1862-1925

http://www.lwfaah.net/people/plessy.htm
 

lest we forget

"
Mississippi John Hurt


    John Hurt was born in Teoc, Mississippi in 1892 and save for some occasional trips to record when he was a young man, rarely ever left the Carroll County region of his native state. When he was about 9, he started playing guitar. His first one, a "Black Annie," cost $1.50. His mother bought it for him.
    "It was some guitar," he recalled. "I would put it on the bed; flies would light on the strings, and they would ring out just as if someone had been playing them."
    As time went on, Hurt developed his own intricate playing style, one almost completely dissimilar to the prevailing styles of the area, a fluid, complex finger style. He played, as he himself puts it, "the way I thought the guitar should sound"
Mississippi John Hurt: The Dramatic Rediscovery Of A Near-Legendary Blues Singer-Guitarist "Av

MISSISSIPPI JOHN HURT

EXHIBIT

FROM AFRICA TO ETERNITY

http://www.lwfaah.net/africa/afri_etr.htm


 


 

NOTE FROM BLACK HISTORY

By Earnest McBride

http://www.bjmjr.net/mcbride/index.htm
 


 

AFRICA

AGRICULTURE

AMERICAN INDIANS

AVIATION

CARIBBEAN

CENTRAL AMERICA

EASTERN - SOUTHERN - SOUTHEASTERN OHIO

ESTEVANICO

EVENTS

GENEALOGY

GENERAL HISTORY

HISTORIC-RESEARCH

HISTORY-CULTURAL

HISTORY OF AMERICANS

MILITARY-VETERANS

MILITARY RECORDS

ORGANIZATIONS

PEOPLE

PERSONAL SITES AND PAGES

PLACES

REFERENCES

RESEARCH

SLAVERY

UNDERGROUND RAILROAD

A HISTORY OF MY PEOPLE

By Audreye E. Johnson, Ph.D., ACSW


Background: Van Sertima found that Africans came to the Americas before Columbus. Africans sailed with Columbus who sought to sail to India. His exploration was bankrolled by Spain. This African connection was due to the Moors who, beginning in the 7th century ruled the southern part of Europe for many years. They became deeply intertwined in the culture and life of Spain and Portugal (read Shakespeare's Othello). The distance between the coasts of Europe and Africa at the Rock of Gibraltar is about six miles; swimming distance and/or gene swapping territory.

The crew of the three ships under Columbus included those of African decent. Their voyage was expected to sail to India, but they landed in the Caribbean of the New World. They were found by the inhabitants whom Columbus called Indians. These Natives befriended the lost sailors/explorers. Later, Columbus, and explorers from England, France, Germany, Netherlands, Portugal, etc., arrived in North and South America including Canada. These were the initial colonizers of the New World. These countries of Europe fought each other for control of land that did not belong to them, mistreating the Native Americans who had befriended them as they claimed "squatters rights" to the land of Native American tribes. England's defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1588 made her a major player in the New World. This was played out in North America which became English speaking via war or land purchase.

The colony of Jamestown was established in 1607, in what is now Virginia. In 1619 the English captured a Dutch ship with people of African decent and Spanish names whom they sold in Jamestown as indentured servants. This was before the Mayflower arrived in 1620 with Caucasian indentured servants; most Caucasians and those of African descent in this period came to America as indentured servants. The need for labor was the backbone of indentured servitude, but did not resolve the labor need as indentured servitude was time limited or could be terminated by paying out the contract via work or money, and a labor force was still needed.

In 1624, William was born to Antoney and Isabell, the first Black child born in America; this was the beginning of the Black family. The legitimacy of the relationship is evidenced by William's birth being recorded in the Church of England in Jamestown.

Getting A Work Force: Massachusetts was the first colony to legalize slavery in 1641, the majority (11) of the colonies had such laws by 1750. In 1644 indentured Africans (11) petitioned for their freedom in New Netherlands (New York), and won. They were kept as indentured servants longer than Caucasian indentured servants. On the other hand, it was Anthony Johnson (probably came as an indentured person, and prospered) who sued and won his suit against a Caucasian to retain a Black indentured servant for life (slave) in Virginia in 1653. Laws permitting slavery grew rapidly with Virginia taking the lead.

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Developed data and external links on LEST WE FORGET, posted, maintained and updated by

BENNIE J. MCRAE, JR.
LWF Communications
Trotwood, Ohio


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Bennie J. McRae, Jr.
LEST WE FORGET, Web Site Manager

AWARDS AND RECOGNITIONS

LEST 
WE
FORGET

FAMILY OF WEB SITES AND INDEX PAGES

http://www.lwfaah.net/webs.htm

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